Catios

  • Canoga Park

    We always encourage clients to make each catio their own. Here, a celebrity client did just that by adding cool lighting. Also check out the floor to ceiling sisal rope scratching / climbing pole that gives the cats the option of jumping off at five different levels!

  • North Hollywood Porch

    This was a cool little project that required our team to match the front patio design. We also changed it up by putting the silver wire mesh on the inside of the structure so that the white wood frame continued to pop from the street.

  • Mount Washington Balcony

    The third Mount Washington catio was built off a balcony and comes with a spectacular view. A bit smaller than the others, we still included a large carpeted “L” shaped shelf, among others, a long sisal rope climbing pole, and a cat and human door.

  • Mount Washington 1 & 2

    This was a monster project where we built three catios at one home over a week for an amazing cat rescuer. You can also check out a time-lapse video of our team constructing the enclosures. These catios have everything including a new and improved easy access litter box door.

  • Northridge

    Another catio that blends in perfectly with the house. All the shelves are carpeted, including a long run at the top of the structure. There’s also carpeting on the bottom of the structure which acts as a cushion for a special needs cat. The floor to ceiling sisal rope pole is a huge hit with most of the cats putting it to immediate use.

  • Glendale

    This was a fun one that included all the bells and whistles. The concrete slab adds stability, makes it easier to clean, and prevents animals from digging underneath the mesh. The bronze polygal roof keeps out the rain and provides shade from the hot summer sun. The cat door is met with a horizontal shelf to make coming and going easy on the cats. The rest of the structure is decked out with a 9′ sisal rope pole, ramps, and shelves.

  • Simi Valley #2

    With all the coyotes in Simi Valley it’s no surprise we get a lot of calls from concerned cat parents wanting to build safe enclosures for their furballs. This home, like the San Fernando Valley model below, had the perfect spot for a catio which enabled us to keep costs way down.

  • Palos Verdes Estates

    This massive enclosure was built to house a family of somewhat feral cats rescued about a year ago. With a threat of foxes, raccoons, and coyotes, we used a strong silver mesh to keep the cats in and the predators out. We also had a custom cat door built for a French door.

  • Culver City

    This large enclosure meshes perfectly with the house and provides the five formerly outdoor cats with a breathtaking view. Because it’s a rental property, we used minimally invasive hardware which can be patched easily should the structure be removed at a later date. Note the Endura Flap window cat door which was installed without tools and can also be removed easily.

  • Placentia

    Our third Orange County enclosure was built for the three adorable cats seen below exploring their new outdoor digs immediately after completion. Like San Dimas, this is an “L” shaped catio that wraps around the house. We kept it thin and concentrated on vertical space, of which there is plenty.

  • Santa Monica Apartment

    After Lando (pictured) survived an eight story fall into some bushes, his cat daddy called us to install a balcony enclosure. Yes, cats do fall from ledges and balconies. We were able to complete the project without screwing anything into the walls, floor, or ceiling, per the building rules. Now Lando and his running mate, Luke, will have access to fresh air, the ocean breeze, and an outdoor litter box despite living well above the palm trees.

  • Simi Valley

    Love the photo of the entire house because of how well the catio blends in to its surroundings. This baby has all the trimmings including a tinted polygal roof, litter box door, deck below the cat door, floor to ceiling sisal rope pole, long carpeted ramp, and a shelf with a carpeted top along the upper back. Despite all that, I can’t say that the cats will enjoy it because there are no cats. The homeowner went out and commissioned an enclosure in anticipation of rescuing cats and kittens. How cool is that?!

  • San Dimas

    Located in the heart of the San Gabriel Valley, this ginormous catio represented many firsts. It was our first veterinarian client. It was our first “L” shaped enclosure which actually wraps around two sides of the house. And it’s the first time we installed a small easy access door next to the litter box to facilitate daily cleaning. Additionally, the inside is amazing with a long carpeted shelf running the entire top back end of the catio and an additional 10 foot ramp runs straight from the cat door to the human door.

  • Long Beach

    This is one beautiful catio where all the colors work brilliantly together. Because the home was across the street from the ocean and had a history of termites, we used pressure treated wood throughout the enclosure. The black mesh slanted roof was intentionally done steep to not interfere with the neighbors and looks spectacular. Finally, we added a long carpeted ramp so that the elderly cats would not have an issue exiting the window.

  • Woodland Hills Stand Alone Catio

    This might have been our toughest challenge to date. Our client was moving into a new house with 12 cats and needed a stand alone structure. First, we carved out a spot in the backyard where we could build a 200+ square foot catio. We attached the enclosure to a tough shed and added two windows for ventilation, as well as a door slot in the front. This will be the go to place for the dozen gatos to keep warm during the winter. Approximately a third of the catio roof is bronze polygal, which provides shade and will protect…